Bosvogels

Wild turkeys are in trouble again

The wild turkey population peaked around 2001 at around 6.7 million birds in North America. But in the years since, it has dropped by about 15 percent. The eastern wild turkey—the most abundant subspecies, which reigns east of the Mississippi River—appears to be declining across parts of the Northeast, Southeast, and Midwest. In New York, hunters in the western part of the state were the first to notice the difference.

Farmland bird decline in the UK was 9% between 2010-15

Birds living and breeding on the UK’s farmland have seen numbers decline by almost a tenth in five years, official figures show. Farmland bird populations have declined by 56% since 1970, largely due to agricultural changes including the loss of mixed farming, a switch to autumn sowing of crops, a reduction in hay meadows and the stripping out of hedgerows.

Die Vogelarten der Nadelwälder im Kanton Zug zeigen negative Entwicklungen

Im Kanton Zug haben sich die Brutvögel in den Naturschutzgebieten während der letzten vier Jahrzehnte unterschiedlich entwickelt. Am meisten unter Druck gekommen sind die Vögel der Moore. So ist der Kiebitz vom Aussterben bedroht. Sein Bestand ging von zehn Paaren auf ein einziges zurück. Eine mehrheitlich negative Entwicklung ist auch bei den Vögeln der Nadelwälder zu beobachten, wie die Direktion des Innern am Dienstag mitteilte. Dies zeigen Daten, die zwischen 1979 und 2016 erhoben wurden.

Warning sounds for charismatic kea

New Zealand’s charismatic kea (Nestor notabilis) - and 2017‘s Bird of the Year - has just been reclassified to “endangered” by global conservation group BirdLife International. The alpine parrot was upgraded from “vulnerable” to “endangered” in BirdLife International’s reassessment of the threat status of birds for the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Negen soorten broedvogels zijn in Nederland uitgestorven en 87 soorten worden nu in hun voortbestaan bedreigd

Het aantal bedreigde broedvogels in Nederland neemt toe. Er staan negen broedvogels meer op de Rode Lijst dan in de vorige publicatie in 2004. Onder meer de torenvalk (Falco tinnunculus) en de wulp (Numenius arquata) staan er nu ook op. Op basis van tellingen van Sovon Volgelonderzoek is te zien welke soorten er zijn verdwenen en welke broedvogels het snelst uitsterven.

The Algerian Nuthatch has declined markedly over the past 25 years

New research has found that Algerian Nuthatch has declined markedly in one of its strongholds over the past 25 years. Algerian Nuthatch (Sitta ledanti) is, as its name suggests, endemic to Algeria. It is found only in the ancient, humid oak forests in the north of the country, occurring at just four known sites: Djebel Babor, Guerrouch Forest in Taza National Park, Tamentout Forest and Djimla Forest. The four sites are relatively close to each other and are all located in the Babor Mountains.

Insects and insectivores on the brink of extinction in the Adirondacks

In September, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service denied a petition to put the Bicknell’s thrush (Catharus bicknelli) on the federal list of endangered species. The Bicknell’s is a medium-size (6-7.5 inches) thrush—brown on the back with a white, spotted underside—that dwells in dense balsam-fir forests in high elevations in the Adirondacks. Following is a primer on other wildlife in trouble in the Adirondack Park.

Declining male offspring further imperil endangered flycatchers in southern California

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications documents the steep decline of a population of endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus) over 16 years -- and the change in the sex ratio that has left the birds' future hanging on a dwindling number of males.

Researchers suspect that nightjars are declining in Illinois

Once common, Whip-poor-wills (Caprimulgus vociferus) and other nocturnal nightjar (Caprimulgus europaeus) species are disappearing from Illinois forests as their habitats shrink and change, according to data from the Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS), a division of the University of Illinois’ Prairie Research Institute. “Because they are nocturnal, monitoring for nightjars can be challenging, but we suspect that they are declining,” said Tara Beveroth, an INHS avian researcher.

New VCE study reveals population health of mountain songbirds

A 16-year study of mountain forest songbirds across New York and New England, including thrushes, warblers and other iconic species, has documented their population changes. Although species like Black-capped Chickadee and Swainson’s Thrush have thrived in the mountains during recent decades, some species that depend on the region’s evergreen forests of spruce and fir – notably Blackpoll Warbler – appear to have undergone substantial declines.